Looking for tickets or info for the Get Happy Tour 2018 featuring Bowling for Soup, Army of Freshmen and The Aquabats?

This domain name was used for the Get Happy Tour back in its original run around 10 years ago, when I used to do work for BFS and AOF. However, for the past 5 years it has been used for my travel blog as I never thought we would have another Get Happy Tour and I didn't want it to go to waste.

But as a favour to two bands who have done a lot for me over the years, and so you don't miss out, ticket info is:
O2 Presale: 10am on 25 September
General Onsale: 10am on 27 September.

Tickets available from ticketmaster.co.uk and bowlingforsoup.com
 


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Posts Tagged ‘Shopping’

Eagle hunting and Lake Issyk-Kul

June 2nd, 2015 No comments

Today ended with an overnight stop at a beautiful lakeside retreat, but earlier in the day I witnessed something which will stick in my mind forever. Those who are squeamish, or those who believe that hunting is wrong, may wish to skip to the end of post as it contains information and photos from an Eagle hunting demonstration which was organised for us.

After breakfast at the home stay we made our way into Kochkor town to pick up some supplies. Prices here were a little higher, although still cheap by western standards, but they had a wider selection and we were able to stock up on personal items like toothbrushes and pens for letters in addition to the usual group supplies. We spent an hour or so shopping before getting back into the truck to head towards Lake Issyk-Kul.

My bed

My bed at the home stay

Dining area

Dining area at the home stay

Home stay

This is the Kochkor home stay

Kochkor

Outside the home stay

Kochkor town

Kochkor town centre

Kochkor

Kochkor town centre

The journey was through the same lovely scenery but this time I spent more time thinking than looking at the landscape going by. The wi-fi started working in the home stay last night as I going to bed and so I was able to get in contact with people and chat to them for a while, but this has made me start to consider whether I want to stay until the end of the trip or come back early. There is absolutely nothing wrong with the trip, in fact I’m having a great time, but somebody close to me is leaving the UK forever on the day that I’m due to arrive back and with all the problems people had with Turkish Airlines on the way out it would be too much if I was delayed and missed saying goodbye. I won’t have any internet tonight to be able to look into prices but should do in Karakol the day after. Although more about that later, if I do decide to come back early, as for now I want to tell you more about my day today.

Kyrgyz scenery

We stopped at a lake to take photos

Helena the truck

Helena while we take photos

A couple of hours passed before we turned off of the road and made our way to a remote spot behind a hill, where we set up lunch. This was also to be the place where we would be given a demonstration of how the locals hunt for food with Eagles, and so was out of the way in order to give the Eagle a quiet place to hunt. Lunch was the usual selection of sandwiches and we had some time to walk around and take in the scenery before the Eagle hunter arrived.

The eagle hunting demonstration was the only part of the trip that I am not sure should have been included so far. I agree that it is part of local tradition but over half of the group were unsure about whether an animal should have to die in order for us to understand the tradition. The animal chosen was a rabbit that was raised by the eagle hunter and which didn’t stand a chance when the Eagle was let loose from a hill overlooking the valley.

Lunch time

Lunch time in Kyrgyzstan

Kyrgyz scenery

Helena being dwarfed by the scenery

Kyrgyz scenery

Some lovely Kyrgyz scenery

Final warning for those who don’t wish to see photos from the Eagle hunting.

One thing I will say is that I am amazed with the beauty, majesty and strength of the Eagle. I have never seem one up close but was given a chance to get up close and personal with her while the hunter was telling us about the local traditions, and about how he came to own her. For the local tribes owning an Eagle is a sign that you are a man, and when you come of age you take your friends up into the mountains to take an egg from a nest (occasionally having to fight off the parents in order to do so). The egg is then incubated by the hunter and the Eagle is raised from birth in order to form an unbreakable bond which allows them to hunt together and remain loyal to each other. A couple of the group said they were going to write to Dragoman to complain but I’m not sure this is necessary – we were all given a chance not to watch the demonstration and to go for a walk while it took place.

Eagle

The hunter and his eagle

Eagle

Vicki and the Eagle

Kyrgyz scenery

Some more beautiful scenery

Eagle hunting

The Eagle closing in on her prey

Eagle hunting

The Eagle proudly guarding her catch

While I’m not sure it was necessary I did find it a very informative and effective insight into local culture. I’ll never forget the images, or the noises, from the demonstration though.

The drive from the Eagle hunting demonstration was fairly uneventful and we arrived at our destination for the day after not much more than an hour. We are staying at a camp on the shores of the lake which is owned by a family and where we have the option to camp or upgrade to a yurt. I was the only guy who chose to upgrade and as the camp is fairly empty I have been given a yurt all to myself. It doesn’t have any lighting or power like a couple of the other yurts but it will be my space and I’m looking forward to it tonight. Don’t get me wrong I love the interaction you get with people on this sort of trip, and that’s one of the reasons I come on them, but you do need your own space occasionally to make sure people’s individual habits don’t bother you.

I spent some time later on at the shore of the lake. The scenery was beautiful and the air was really warm but wow was the water cold. Obviously due to the high altitude, the glacial melt and the deepness of the lake it doesn’t get too warm so if you are planning to swim here please take care. The only other place I have been swimming where the water was this cold was at a national park in Namibia so I was only able to stay in there for about a minute before having to get out.

Lake Issyk-Kul

Lake Issyk-Kul

Lake Issyk-Kul

These were at the Yurt Camp

Yurt Camp

This is our Yurt Camp

After dinner a few of us made a bonfire out of some wood that was made available for us, but we were basically given whole trees so this meant a lot of axe work to make anything small enough to burn. It was also really wet so was hard to light and we had to use a combination of fire lighters and toilet paper to get it going. Once it was lit we had a great time chatting to each other and soaking up the atmosphere, although I’m a little worried about one of the kids from the camp who decided to join us. He showed us a video that he had on his phone, and acted it out, but it looked and sounded like some sort of jihadi extremist propaganda video. Hopefully I’m just thinking too much into it but it was a bit scary!

Bonfire time

Bonfire time

I’m sat in my private yurt now and am thinking some more about whether or not to make the journey home early. I think I probably will come back early as long as flights are available but I will have to wait for two more days until we are in Karakol before I will have wi-fi in order to check. As I said in a previous entry I’m not thinking about coming back early due to the trip itself it’s simply because I have something I need to take care of back home – sometimes you have to do what you have to do.

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Visiting a Kiev Shooting Range

June 21st, 2013 No comments

One thing I discovered online while researching things to do on the final spare day in Kiev is the possibility to visit a shooting range outside of the city. I’m far from being a gun enthusiast, and in fact I’m proud that I live in a country where people don’t have access to guns, but I’m the sort of person that likes to experience everything. So when a couple of other people in the group said that they were interested in visiting the range we decided it would be an experience.

It took some time to organise the trip to the shooting range. Before going to Chernobyl a few days ago we tried to book but couldn’t get through to them on the phone. The concierge at the hotel offered to try for us again and book while we were in Chernobyl but when we returned we found they hadn’t booked it – all they had done was call to find prices for us. So we called them back again and it seems we interrupted the guy when he was “busy” with a woman and were asked to call back later. When we finally managed to get through to him we arranged to be picked up from the hotel after breakfast.

The trip out to the range only took half an hour or so and we spent most of the time talking about the last couple of days exploring the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. The minibus we had was a luxury executive seater which would have been great to have over the last couple of days. I think the general consensus between the group, except for the disagreement yesterday, is that the discomfort of the minibus was the only bad point of our visit.

On the minibus

On the minibus to the shooting range

When we arrived at the shooting range there was a short delay while the group ahead of us finished their turn on the range. It seems that the range isn’t just used by amateurs as it was being used by bank security guards. We took the time to sit and relax while confirming which weapons we were interested in firing. We had booked AK-47, Dragunov Sniper Rifle and Shotgun but decided to swap the shotgun for a pistol and we found out the Dragunov was unavailable so would be swapped for an M4 Assault Rifle. This change wasn’t too much of an issue for any of us as the main thing we were interested in was the AK-47.

We spent maybe an hour or so firing the various weapons. During my time on the M-4 it kept jamming so we it was swapped out for an M-16 which was fine by me as it meant I was able to try out more guns for the same price. A few of us decided to pay a little extra to take a turn on the pump-action shotgun anyway though as we were given the option to have 10 shots on any other weapon for a set price. I have to say it was a little scary how big the adrenaline surge that the shotgun gave us was – all of us found it the same and were rather jumpy at the end of our 10 shots. I am glad I chose to have a turn on it but I don’t hope to be using one again any time soon!

AK-47

One of our group with an AK-47

AK-47 impact

An AK-47 hitting the end of the range

Pistol time

Pistol time

M-4

Next was an M-4

M-16

Then it was on to an M-16

Shotgun

Finally it was a shotgun

AK-47 target

Apparently my AK-47 shooting is rather accurate!

On the way back the minibus driver dropped us in the city so we could have lunch and stock up on souvenirs (or ‘tat’ as most of the group had started to call it). We decided that the area around St Andrew’s Church would be a good place to start as we saw loads of souvenir stands there the other day and it was close to the old town that we also wanted to visit.

We spent some time checking out all of the souvenir stalls before slowly making our way down towards the old town. The road down the hill was still lined with stalls but the majority of the better ones were up the top where we started. We were all starting to get pretty hungry by this point so decided to grab something to eat at a restaurant half way down the hill which had a nice terrace overlooking the street. A bit stereotypical but I decided to have Chicken Kiev and while it was very different to what we have back in The UK it was really nice.

Souvenirs

Lots of souvenirs were available

Walking around Kiev

Walking towards the old town

Chicken Kiev

Eating Chicken Kiev

Lunch time

Looking out from the restaurant

When we got to the bottom of the hill we spent a little time exploring the old town but it was starting to get a little late in the afternoon so we made our way towards the Funicular that travels from the old town up to the top of the hill. We spent a long time trying to find it as it was further away than we thought but a couple of locals helped point us in the right direction. It’s right on the main road though so if you plan to use this to get back to the city centre just head up the hill out of the old town along the main road and it’s on your right you can’t miss it.

The views from the Funicular weren’t as spectacular as we hoped as the trees were in the way but it was incredibly cheap (the equivalent of 15p) and took us back up to the back of St Michael’s in no time. We relaxed up in the park taking photos for a little while before deciding to head back to the hotel ready for our night on the town. There were 5 of us so it would have been too many for one taxi so I decided to make my own way back on foot as I was in the mood for exploring on my own anyway.

Old Kiev

The Old Town

The Funicular

The entrance to the Funicular

Kiev Funicular

This is the Funicular in Kiev

I said my goodbyes to the group and made my way back to the hotel via St Sofia’s Cathedral and then some of the back roads that ran parallel to the Khreshchatyk street to get a sense of what Kiev is like away from the main roads that tourists use. I took some great photos along the way and eventually got back to regular surroundings in the vicinity of the Lenin statue.

Statue in Kiev

Walking back to the hotel

Kiev Independence Square

Independence Square

Walking around Kiev

Khreschatyk Street is the main street in Kiev

Time for a quick refresh in my room before meeting the others down in the hotel bar. We had found a Ukraininan restaurant down the road from the hotel that served traditional foods with live music and homemade drinks so decided this would be a great place for a final group meal. We were right in some aspects, but how wrong we were in others.

This is a view of the Hotel Rus

Our hotel

Hotel Rus

The hotel bar / restaurant outside on the terrace

The restaurant, called Shinok, had a great atmosphere. We were greeted with homemade flavoured vodka when we arrived before being shown to our seats. There was a live folk band playing in the room next door which helped the atmosphere and the staff were really friendly. We couldn’t decide what to have as a starter so the waiter persuaded us to try some sharing plates in the centre of the table. The sharers were really nice, as was my veal main course, but we had a nasty surprise when the bill arrived. What we didn’t realise was how expensive the sharers or homemade drinks we were served at regular intervals were and several of us didn’t have enough money to cover our share. Luckily between us we had enough, and I had just enough to cover everything, but it meant that we had to walk the 2km back to the hotel. It provided a great chance to see more of the city and get away from a couple of people who kicked up over the price of the meal plus a few other things.

Music Time

Entertainment at the final meal

Dinner Time

Dinner for me. It was yummy 🙂

Kiev by night

Kiev by night from my room

I’m back in my room now and have just finished packing for the flight back to London tomorrow. We need to leave fairly early so I’m not able to do my usual last minute panic packing that tends to happen every time. Sometimes I even surprise myself!

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Great Barrier Reef

June 21st, 2007 No comments

My time in Cairns is over, and I’m now in Brisbane. Cairns was a pretty touristy city but luckily my hotel was far enough out to let me experience more of the traditional Queensland than most people do. At least I saw the Great Barrier Reef though which is the highlight of any visit to Queensland and no trip to Cairns can be complete without a visit out to dive or snorkel it.

The day after my long tour through the rainforest I was picked up in the morning by Quicksilver for the short ride north along the coast to Port Douglas. After arriving we went through the security procedures for the Quicksilver vessel (we had to look into a camera and say our name) and then we could go on board.

Quicksilver vessel

Quicksilver vessel

Port Douglas

Port Douglas

Our destination was a permanent Quicksilver pontoon about 40 miles off the coast although the sailing time was only about an hour as the vessel was a high-speed catamaran. I thought a permanent, fully serviced pontoon was the easy option for my first time in the area but next time I’ll probably use a smaller operator who goes different places each time as the sheer number of people that Quicksilver caters for is damaging the reef – mainly through sun lotion and other creams.

The Pontoon

The Pontoon

Snorkelling

Snorkeling

A FISH

A FISH

After arriving at the pontoon I waited for lunch to be served and then had about 2 hours of snorkeling time which was more than enough as I was travelling on my own. I took a couple of disposable cameras and used up all of the photos on them – I’ll see if I can scan them and upload them later. There were plenty of fish of all different kinds – small and large. My mission for the day was to find a clownfish so I could say I’ve seen Nemo in his natural habitat. I had almost given up when I saw one on the way back to the pontoon right at the end of my time on the reef. He was only tiny but I managed to get a photo.

I got back onto the pontoon and got dressed before checking out the official photos that had been taken throughout the day. I knew a couple of me had been so bought them – expensive for what they were but they were a good souvenir. They were ready for us when we arrived back in Port Douglas and came out quite well.

On the way back I sat next to this family from Tasmania. I got talking to them after we went over a big wave just after the Grandmother said the ride was nice and smooth. We ended up talking most of the way back and they were a really nice family. The mother squashed past me once and we went over a wave – she fell onto my lap and said “ooo… you’re cofortable. Thanks”. The daughter was polite too and said sorry every time she had to come past me. Nice people – glad to have met them.

We then made our way back to Cairns where I relaxed at the hotel for the evening.

Told you it was fast!

Told you it was fast!

Yesterday was my last full day in Cairns so I decided to make the most of it and see all of the things I wanted to see but hadn’t had a chance to so far. Firstly I bought breakfast at the hotel then wandered up the road to the Centenary Lakes. A small attraction but they were inside the front cover of my guide book and looked nice so wanted to see them. I highly recommend walking through the lakes area if you find yourself in this part of Cairns – there is a lovely rainforest boardwalk that you can wander along and loads of great photo spots. If it’s summer you can also relax with a barbecue or maybe take one of the walks up the hillside overlooking the city. I spent some time exploring the area and taking photos before walking back to the hotel to get the bus into the city again. I had lunch on the seafront in the city (pizza again), did last minute shopping in the touristy bit of the city and finally explored around the marina area before getting the bus back to the hotel to relax for the evening.

Walking to Centenary Lakes

Walking to Centenary Lakes

Centenary Lakes

Centenary Lakes

Rainforest Boardwalk

Rainforest Boardwalk

Cairns

Cairns

Cairns

Cairns

This morning I got up early and took some photos around the hotel before my bag was collected and taken to the reception ready for the complimentary minibus back to the airport. I only had one bag and it wasn’t heavy but I needed to make sure I was up for my flight so used it as more of a wake-up service than a bag-collection service. I was taken to the airport quite early as they wanted to combine me with somebody else that was leaving at a similar time. I checked in when I arrived but had to wait quite a while in the departure lounge before my flight. It’s a small airport but I picked up a few last minute souvenirs.

My hotel

My hotel

Hotel Pool

Hotel Pool

Brisbane is still in Queensland but the state is huge and the flight was 2 hours which is almost as long as from London to Rome! The transfer from Brisbane airport to my hotel (The Mercure) was smooth and there was somebody waiting for me at the airport. I arrived at the hotel mid-afternoon and went out to explore the city, had dinner and took plenty of photos. While walking along the riverbank I received a phone call from somebody at my University who was trying to get me to work for them for a few months. I accepted, but declined the offer of doing a doctorate with them – don’t think it would be for me. It’s strange the things that happen when you travel.

Brisbane

Brisbane

Tomorrow I’m off to Australia Zoo which was made famous by Crocodile Hunter Steve Irwin before his death. It looks like a nice place so can’t wait and it’s one of the things that made me decide to visit Brisbane and Australia as a whole!

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The return of old friends!

August 22nd, 2002 No comments

Today we left the coast and headed back to Windhoek for the last time. On the way we stopped at a local craft market to purchase some souvenirs and I decided to buy lots of woodwork and other crafts including bowls and little statues. They wanted a mixture of both cash and other items. I was able to part-exchange an old watch, old pair of shoes and some unused suncream for some of the statues. It was a nice place to pick up traditional souvenirs but there were so many people there in competition it almost felt like we were being fed to the Wolves at times but they were really friendly with it and we never felt threatened or anything.

The market

The market

After arriving back in Windhoek we did some last minute shopping in the city centre – parking in the same car park by the Supreme Court again. I bought some souvenirs for people and also stocked up on Steers Special Seasoning. I tell you – this stuff has been a life saver these past few weeks. We bought it on the first day just to spice things up occasionally but ended up using it on everything every night so had to re-supply ourselves with some when we stopped at the supermarket in Mariental after leaving Hardap. The food we were supplied in advance (the MacDougall’s stews etc) was so horrible it tasted like watery cardboard. I think what we didn’t use was exchanged by people in the craft market too but the Steers definitely helped get us through until we could get some proper supplies. Although we carried on using it after getting supplies as it’s nice stuff!

Windhoek City Centre

Windhoek City Centre

Windhoek City Centre

Windhoek City Centre

When I got back to the truck Dan was causing more problems and this time for the locals not just us. There was a kid that was trying to sell the people in the truck some sort of traditional musical instrument. Dan decided it would be a good idea to demonstrate his spear that he bought at the craft market and when I got back to the truck he was chasing this poor kid across the car park waving the spear over his head to cries of “don’t kill me… don’t kill me”. If that isn’t an example of how bad things were getting with him, and an example of something that will destroy relationships between Africa and Europe, then I don’t know what is. It was also not a good idea to do that outside of the Namibian Supreme Court but luckily for our group he didn’t cause some sort of international incident.

Our Truck

Our Truck

Supreme Court

Supreme Court

We then made our way back to the same hostel we started at on the first night. I arranged it so we were in the same room again… and were greeted by seeing GERTRUDE again! When we were relaxing in our room the Meerkat paid us a visit too. It came walking into the room and straight under one of the beds. We wondered what he was looking for until I laid down and saw him unwrap and then eat a boiled sweet that somebody had accidentally dropped. That creature was so cute… I love Meerkats!

Meerkat on the bed

Meerkat on the bed

Meerkat feast

Meerkat feast

GERTRUDE!!! AGAIN!!!

GERTRUDE!!! AGAIN!!!

Tonight we decided to blow the money we had left on ordering something like 18 pizzas for us all to share and while they were basic they were also really nice. As pizza is my favourite meal it’s a fitting end to my time in this amazing country. I’ll be sad to say goodbye in the morning!

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Gibeon project – week 1

August 2nd, 2002 No comments

We’ve been in Gibeon around a week now and are having a great time in some respects but not in others which I’ll explain more about in this post.

After leaving the hostel last week we made our way into the city centre. Our main priorities were to exchange money and get supplies. The supplies aspect wasn’t too difficult as our truck parked in a huge car park right in the centre outside the Namibian Supreme Court and right next to a supermarket. It wasn’t as big as the Sainsbury’s you would be used to in the UK or the Wal-Marts you would be used to in the USA but sold everything we needed. The exchanging of money took a little bit longer due to all of the local regulations. I didn’t need to exchange so much money as I had already purchased some South African Rand before leaving the UK and Namibia accepts it as a dual-currency which has come in handy. While the others were still inside a few of us were outside and were approached by a Namibian beggar. In the UK we are used to people holding signs while begging – this guy had what looked like a flick-knife in his hand. Not as scary as it might have been though – we told him we weren’t interested and he accepted this and walked away.

Windhoek

Windhoek

After finishing in Windhoek we made our way out of the city, past a petrol station that was on fire, and into the country towards Gibeon. The countryside is amazing here. It’s not as green as in Europe but there are still some plants around and some wildlife. We arrived in Gibeon in the afternoon and went straight to the school. They were happy to see us as they were expecting us the day before and had called the British High Commission in Windhoek asking if they knew where we were. They said they didn’t – even though we left them an information pack with our itinerary. Although maybe they never found it – they didn’t open by the time we left Windhoek so it was just thrown over the front gate and into the grounds.

Driving

Driving

The school said we could have some spare rooms in the school if we wanted but we decided to camp as we had brought the equipment with us anyway. We had to be careful when setting the tents up as there were some really evil things on the ground that looked like thistle heads but were sharper and if you put your tent on them they hurt!

That evening we were invited to the school hall where the kids gave us a presentation. They sang and danced and also performed a scene depicting life in Namibia (although that part was in Nama so we didn’t understand it). They then sang the Namibian National Anthem before inviting us on stage. We all introduced ourselves before singing our National Anthem – WAY worse than they sang! One thing I will always remember from this evening is how embarrassed Dan B looked. He’s the smallest member of our group but has one of the deepest voices which some of the kids found this hilarious although Dan went all red 🙁

Setting up camp

Setting up camp

Our campsite

Our campsite

In the school hall

In the school hall

The next day (28th) we played a football match with some kids from the school. We won on penalties after a 3-3 draw but they quite obviously let us win and were a LOT better despite none of them wearing shoes during the game. We found out later that the school team was the best in the region! We were then shown around by the school Principal – Mr Fleermuys. We were shown the facilities, teaching rooms and accommodation before being told his vision for the school. He’s thinking big!

Playing Football

Playing Football

In the afternoon we started getting to know some of the kids. Bradley is the one that stands out the most. He’s only 4 years old but has attached himself to a few of us, including Sam and myself, as if he’s another member of the team – he doesn’t speak English and we had to ask him his name in Afrikaans but he’s great! There are other kids that are hanging around that I get on well with overall – Kakashol and Sebu…. although they have outstayed their welcome after ruining somebody’s sunglasses and biting me. That evening we sampled the local beer (Tafel) but unfortunately some of us the team got very drunk and caused us to miss the church service we had been invited to that evening. An alcohol ban came in place quite quickly!

BRADLEY

BRADLEY

A bad pic of me and Bradley

A bad pic of me and Bradley

Some other kids at the school

Some other kids at the school

Teaching Rugby

Teaching Rugby

The next couple of days were mainly dedicated to working on the projects in the school, getting supplies and sending letters to people. We won’t finish the projects on this visit but Mr Fleermuys said he knows this and that his vision is a five year project incorporating several visits by groups from World Challenge Expeditions. Supplies have been a little more difficult to find. The shops in town only really sell everyday essentials so groups of us have gone to the nearest town a few times, Mariental, which is almost 70 miles away. The first time we went to the post office it was closed by the time we found it. We got lost in the town but some local kids showed us the way and we gave them a small amount of money for their help. The next day it was open and we sent letters home.

They got this in to help

They got this in to help

Starting work

Starting work

Working on the volleyball court

Working on the volleyball court

Bradley trying to help

Bradley trying to help

Walking into town

Walking into town

Phoning home

Calling home

Over the last couple of days things have been going downhill. The principal seems to be more interested in the money we have than our help and we recently found out he has been hiding things from us. The school does need improvement but one of the students showed us to their computer room – it only has one PC but we were told there were no computers in the school. Lots of little things like that, too many to list, have just been making us feel a little unwelcome although nothing that is enough to make us leave on its own. We’re going to do what we can do realistically then move on somewhere else I think.

However tonight was a good night in that we were invited to a BBQ (braai) that some of the teachers had set up for us. It was fresh goat that had been slaughtered that day for us and I’ve never had such fresh food. They could have been a bit more tactful and not said “Do you like our goat? We slaughtered it for you this morning” while I was eating a mouthful but it was very tasty. We all sat around the BBQ eating goat and homemade bread while talking with the teachers – the food was a lot better than the random cardboard chicken we have been having and a lot more successful too (see below)! I showed them the school prospectus and they were thrilled to see it and asked if they could keep it. I knew it would be a good idea. A fairly late night tonight but it’s been a good day although these little things have been mounting up a lot.

BBQ with the teachers

BBQ with the teachers

Dan makes fire!!

Dan makes fire!!

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