Looking for tickets or info for the Get Happy Tour 2018 featuring Bowling for Soup, Army of Freshmen and The Aquabats?

This domain name was used for the Get Happy Tour back in its original run around 10 years ago, when I used to do work for BFS and AOF. However, for the past 5 years it has been used for my travel blog as I never thought we would have another Get Happy Tour and I didn't want it to go to waste.

But as a favour to two bands who have done a lot for me over the years, and so you don't miss out, ticket info is:
O2 Presale: 10am on 25 September
General Onsale: 10am on 27 September.

Tickets available from ticketmaster.co.uk and bowlingforsoup.com
 


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Posts Tagged ‘Rwanda’

I’m back in Uganda!

February 28th, 2012 No comments

I’ve finally arrived in Uganda and I’m really happy to be here, but it has required another very long travelling day – one of the hazards of travel I guess!

Yesterday after travelling to London I checked into the Travelodge near Heathrow which was the hotel I stayed at before visiting Central America and it provided good connections to the airport. Then this morning grabbed an early night bus to the airport so that I would arrive in plenty of time to check my luggage weight – I was carrying a huge bag of toy cars for the kids and a couple of hundred pairs of underwear that was being sent over by my friends family so the bag was a bit on the heavy side but luckily it was still within the limit. I also spent some time doing last minute research about things to do as my new flights arrived in time for me to have a good nights sleep before exploring Entebbe in the morning.

I thought my luck had run out again when we got to the departure gate as we were told our plane would be delayed by at least 30 minutes due to technical problems and with a short connection and terminal change required when I arrived in Brussels I was worried I would miss my flight to Africa. However it turned out connections in Brussels work a lot better than in many hub airports and I arrived at the gate with plenty of time to spare. Brussels Airlines seem to travel to lots of destinations in Africa – I saw flights to Sierra Leone, Togo, Guinea and Ghana on the boards in addition to my flight to Rwanda and Uganda.

The flight to Africa went smoothly and we arrived at Kigali airport in Rwanda for our stopover a little early. It was a shame the sun had already set as it seemed we flew in between the hills of Rwanda and over the city before landing so it would have been a great view. It was also a shame that my arrival in Rwanda was only for a stopover as I really enjoyed the few days I spent there in 2009 and one day hope to return.

Flying from London to Entebbe, via Brussels and Kigali

The view from the plane on the way to Brussels

Stopping to let passengers off in Rwanda

We stopped to change passengers at Kigali Airport, Rwanda

After less than an hour, during which the plane was cleaned by a crew of people that looked like Ghostbusters we departed for my final stop of Entebbe, Uganda. The flight went really quickly and, as the airport is on a peninsula, it was very unsettling to have felt the plane touch down without being able to see land or any lights. I stocked up on supplies while waiting for my luggage before heading out to meet the guy who was transferring me to the Entebbe Backpackers where I’m spending the night. The hostel is ideal for my needs as they have private cottage rooms available for only $25 including transfer from the airport at any time of the day or night. I’m in my room now, and it’s very basic, but has everything I need – a bed with (most of) a mosquito net, a shower, power sockets to charge my phone and seems secure and quiet enough for me to get a good nights sleep ready for an early start tomorrow.

My room at the Entebbe Backpackers

My bed at the Entebbe Backpackers

My bathroom at the Entebbe Backpackers

My private bathroom in Entebbe

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Charlie : Kigali Airport, Rwanda

February 28th, 2012 No comments

Charlie is currently relaxing on board a Brussels Airlines aircraft at Kigali Airport, Rwanda, during a stopover on the way to Uganda. Unfortunately we will not be visiting Rwanda on this trip, and will not even be leaving the aircraft while they clean it and change some passengers, which is a shame as I enjoyed my visit here a few years ago so it would be good for Charlie to have been able to see it too. However I was keen for Charlie to at least be in a photo on Rwandan soil.

Charlie

Charlie at Kigali Airport, Rwanda

Soon we will be leaving Kigali for the short flight to Entebbe, Uganda, where I start my week in the country visiting a friend.

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I’m off to Uganda again!

February 25th, 2012 No comments

When I heard that my friend was going to be spending a year volunteering at an orphanage in the town of Jinja, Uganda, I was very excited. I spent a few days in the town a few years ago and loved it just as I did the rest of Uganda. So when it was suggested that I flew out to visit as I would be allowed to stay at the orphanage for free I jumped at the idea.

I needed to get a break away from things so after a few days of searching I managed to find some flights for a very cheap £370 with Gulf Air via Bahrain – even my direct sale flights to Nairobi a few years ago cost more than this so I couldn’t believe my luck. The only downside is the flight arrives into Uganda at 230am but for the price I couldn’t say no. Plus it would fit a trip to my favourite country in the middle of a very busy few months of travelling – less than 2 weeks after getting back home from my Central America trip and a month before visiting Amsterdam to see my favourite band.

Luckily I’m the sort of person that when I travel I check everything twice. After arriving back from Central America I logged onto Expedia to print everything off and then since there was a Gulf Air confirmation code listed I decided to log onto the Gulf Air website to see if I was able to reserve my seat. However upon loading up the Gulf Air site the legs of my trip between Manama and Entebbe were missing – I called Gulf Air and found out that they had cancelled the route due to lack of sales and that I would need to go through Expedia to get a refund. Unfortunately they were unable to help as I called at the weekend and the department I needed to talk to were only open Monday – Friday so it was a tense couple of days waiting to get my refund. I passed the time by looking for new flights but couldn’t find anything for less than £500 although this was via a very interesting route. The route offered would take me to Ethiopia and Rwanda before arriving in Uganda – on the way back I would connect through Ethiopia and Rome and this sounded like a load of fun but I decided to wait for my refund before booking anything.

I’m glad I waited as I managed to find flights for £100 less in a last minute sale with Brussels Airlines that would have be transit in Belgium and Rwanda which I booked without hesitation. I’m all packed, am leaving in a few days, and am really excited!

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Africa videos

September 16th, 2009 No comments

I’ve finally been able to upload all of my videos from Africa. They’re all now on YouTube and can be viewed below, or in full by clicking on the videos themselves. If you have a user on YouTube feel free to comment on the videos if you want.


Baboon Family at Lake Nakuru National Park, Kenya – August 24, 2009
 


View from Ngumo Primary School, Gilgil, Kenya – August 25th, 2009
 


Meeting local kids on the Tea Plantation walk near Fort Portal, Uganda – August 27th, 2009
 


Chimpanzees at the Kibale Forest National Park, Uganda – August 27th, 2009
 


The Amahoro Group of Mountain Gorillas during our trek, Rwanda [1/2] – August 31st, 2009
 


The Amahoro Group of Mountain Gorillas during our trek, Rwanda [2/2] – August 31st, 2009
 


Pygmy village dancing and singing for us near Ruhengeri, Rwanda – September 1st, 2009
 


Some of our group rafting on the River Nile at Jinja, Uganda – September 4th, 2009
 


Visiting Bujagali Falls near Jinja, Uganda – September 4th, 2009
 


Den, Amanda, Jono and Al go Bungee Jumping at Adrift near Jinja, Uganda – September 4th, 2009
 


Al number 2 goes Bungee Jumping at Adrift near Jinja, Uganda – September 4th, 2009
 


Having fun at the campsite near Eldoret, Kenya – September 5th, 2009
(This is the video with the 50 states, the rapping etc)
 


A Sparrow attacking itself in Oscar’s mirror at the campsite near Eldoret, Kenya – September 6th, 2009

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Africa Day 13 – Back to Uganda

September 2nd, 2009 No comments

Today we got up at 5am to slowly get ready for another long drive day back into Uganda, with breakfast scheduled for 6am and our departure for 7am. We started heading towards Kigali before taking a shortcut through the mountains to cut some time from what was to be a very long journey. The shortcut was a fairly bad road but showed us some amazing views over the tea plantations and valleys that made up this part of the country. We stopped a couple of times for some photo opportunities, and to ask for directions to Byumba –on the road to Uganda. It did indeed save some time but wasn’t a pleasant journey other than the photo opportunities it provided.

Scenery on the way out of Ruhengeri

Scenery on the way out of Ruhengeri

Bikes seem popular in this town

Bikes seem popular in this town

I finally sat at the table without my bag being moved

I finally sat at the table without my bag being moved

Rwandan Tea Plantations

Rwandan Tea Plantations

A vew down to the valley in Rwanda

A vew down to the valley in Rwanda

More scenery

More scenery

When we got back onto the main road that we entered the country on we increased our speed and arrived at the border in no time. The Rwandan side was efficient but the Ugandan side made us pay again despite us never leaving the East African Community. We should have still been valid to travel on our original visa and the Ugandan High Commission in London said this too but she was the lady on the border that could stop us from entering if she wanted – the leaflet she showed us to make us pay was very out of date but this is Africa. Al remembered to ask for a receipt so she couldn’t pocket the money herself.

A very weird tree

A very weird tree

"Child Friendly School"... as opposed to what?!?!?

“Child Friendly School”… as opposed to what?!?!?

A taxi of some sorts, I think in Uganda

A taxi of some sorts, I think in Uganda

After crossing the border we made our way to Kabale where we were met by Jennifer the banana girl again. We talked to her for a bit but didn’t buy anything  as we had already eaten lunch in a bakery in town while Den shopped for supplies. I wouldn’t recommend buying from street sellers like Jennifer while in Africa as the quality of the produce can be questionable – her bananas were well past their best.

We tried to get diesel but the station had sold out so we left Kabale in a bit of a rush. Even though we started early we weren’t sure if we would get to Lake Mburo in time as it’s a long drive and the National Park closed early. A few people kicked up a fuss and demanded that we try to get there on time so the drivers put their foot down while we decided whether to rush, bush camp or find somewhere on the way. A few tantrums later nothing was decided to when we arrived at Mbarara Jono made the decision to stop at a motel with an adjoining campsite at the side of the road. We were the only people staying there that night and it was a nice place with nice showers, decent toilets and a nice bar which the locals also used.

The place looks quite secure, is dry, has a nice bar, sells Mountain Dew, has darts and also a pool table which some of our group played tonight against the locals and it was a nice opportunity to mingle and relax so to tell you the truth I’m glad we decided to stop here. The plan seems to be head off early tomorrow to see Lake Mburo anyway so we won’t miss anything that’s on the itinerary.

At the campsite in Mbarara

At the campsite in Mbarara

I was very tired after such a long day, and the thought of a hideously early start

I was very tired after such a long day, and the thought of a hideously early start

Tomorrow we have to be up at 4am ready for a 5am departure so an early night for me tonight but a few of the group are having drinks in the campsite so I might join them for a bit first.

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Africa Day 12 – Pygmies + This is Africa

September 1st, 2009 No comments

I got up at 7am today before having a nice breakfast of cereal, eggs and toast and catching up on writing this journal. We all met by the truck at 9am to see some pygmies when a matatu minibus arrived with two guides in to take us there. The matatu now overtakes an American school bus to become the most uncomfortable mode of transport I have ever had inflicted on me as I managed to get cramp, lose all circulation in one of my legs and break my belt somehow – this is Africa.

Trip updating his journal

Trip updating his journal

Having breakfast

Having breakfast

The compound at Fatimas

The compound at Fatimas

In a Matatu on the way to the pygmies

In a Matatu on the way to the pygmies

When we arrived at the town we weren’t convinced the people were really pygmies. Yes it’s true some of them were smaller than average but I’m quite tall and some of them were as tall as me. Our guide explained this is due to mixing with the local population which is quite sad but explains our concerns.

We were taken to the centre of the village where they put on a song and dance show for us and some of the group got pulled up to dance too including Pete, Sue Ellen, Leon and unfortunately me too. I think Pete got some photos of me which I’ll have to hijack at some point. It was a fairly good experience.

The tribe dancing for us

The tribe dancing for us

Trip dancing with the Pygmies

Trip dancing with the Pygmies

Portrait shot

Portrait shot

After the end of the show we were taken on the tour of the village and could tell something was wrong. A lady who seemed to be one of the village elders was arguing in Kinyarwanda with the guide but he was making excuses saying she was just getting emotional to see us but we could tell he wasn’t telling us the truth. The village in general didn’t seem happy with us so we decided it was a good idea to leave asap and get back to Fatima’s. Jono decided he was going to go back up in the truck later with somebody he could trust to translate for us to see what was going on.

One of the huts the tribe live in

One of the huts the tribe live in

Some of the kids at the Pygmy village

Some of the kids at the Pygmy village

Jono becoming suspicious of the tour guide

Jono becoming suspicious of the tour guide

Weird halo thing

Weird halo thing

After getting back to Fatima’s we talked about the situation before having a quick lunch and heading into town to go shopping. After dodging a few begging kids we found a craft shop and I did a lot of shopping here. There was nothing stereotypically touristy in town at all but maybe this is a good thing as it made sure we bought traditional goods made from wood and banana leaves and not mass-produced t-shirts or key rings.

We found a clothing market and looked around but didn’t find anything so walked back to Fatima’s the long way round to see more of the town. We saw Oscar the truck leaving the compound to visit the pygmy village and after arriving back myself, Leon, Cass, trip and Pete chatted for a while in another surreal situation with eagles and vultures circling overhead before another big overland truck arrived. We definitely arrived in time and not only got the best location but a guaranteed use of the private rooms.

The main road in Ruhengeri

The main road in Ruhengeri

Walking back to Fatimas

Walking back to Fatimas

Another vulture watching us

Another vulture watching us

A while later Oscar got back with everybody that had been to visit the village to find out what went on earlier. They went to the village but it was almost empty so they were directed up the hill to the next village where everybody had gone. They managed to find the leader and, through a translator, found out that out of the $65 they were promised for the show they were given $20 which they were understandably upset about. We told them we would try to make better arrangements in future and would talk to Greg the go-to guy tonight to make sure they got paid in full. We’re not sure who pocketed the money Greg or the guide but something dodgy had been going on.

Later that day we walked into town to go to Greg’s house which was right behind the clothes market we found earlier. We all sat on mats on the grass for another traditional African meal and a talk by Francis about the history of Rwanda and the experiences in the local area during the Genocide. During this talk Jono took Greg aside to talk to him and negotiated our price down to $15 from $20 each and he also made him promise to give the village everything they deserved. I believe him when he said that as he would be stupid to do the same thing twice after being found out but then again this is Africa.

Dinner at Gregs house

Dinner at Gregs house

We walked back to Fatima’s through town with people whispering Mzungu from the shadows again. I guess they’re not used to white guys walking through the town at night but it was nice to see another side of Rwanda. After getting back I talked to Al for a bit before showering and heading to my room. No soft porn sounds coming from the reception today so hopefully I’ll get a good nights sleep!

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Categories: 2009 East Africa Tags: , , ,

Africa Day 11 – Gorilla Trek

August 31st, 2009 No comments

Today was the day we had all been waiting for when we would finally see the rare Mountain Gorillas in Rwanda’s Volcanoes National Park. I woke at 5am before getting ready and making sure that everybody who had upgraded to a room were awake and having a quick breakfast. We had to be ready for 6.15 to get into minibuses that would take us to the Park HQ which was a big task for me due to not being a morning person.

Arriving at Park HQ

Arriving at Park HQ

Our Trek Group

Our Trek Group

After arriving we all signed in and sorted ourselves into groups. I didn’t mind which group I was in except I didn’t want to be in the group that would trek the most difficult routes and I ended up in the easy group that would trek to see the Amahoro group of Gorillas.

The Amahoro Group

The Amahoro Group

Map of the area

Map of the area

It took around 45 minutes to drive from the Park HQ to the location where we would enter the park for our trek, via the guides home where he got supplies for the day. During our time outside his house we saw a bunch of kids eating raw sugar cane which seems a popular snack but not something I wish to try. For the final 20 minutes our journey was up a really bumpy track with kids waving at us and showing us art and our driver described the drive as “An African Massage”. After last minute preparations we met our soldier guides and entered the park at around 9am.

The track to the start of our Gorilla Trek

The track to the start of our Gorilla Trek

Start of the Trek

Start of the Trek

The Bisoke Volcano

The Bisoke Volcano

The start of the trek was fairly steep but it soon evened out and the trek was evenly matched throughout between climbing up hills and walking along flat paths. We took things easy as some members of the group needed to take regular breaks however it took almost as much effort to avoid the stinging nettles in the park as it did to walk up the hills.

Me after enterring the park

Me after enterring the park

Starting to trek to the Gorillas

Starting to trek to the Gorillas

Me posing after about an hour of trekking

Me posing after about an hour of trekking

Scenery in the park looking towwards the DRC

Scenery in the park looking towwards the DRC

Around 1 hour 40 minutes after entering the park we caught up with the trackers that spend a week at a time in the park with each family of gorillas and left our bags with them so we could spend our hour with the Gorillas with ease and without interfering with them too much. After leaving the trackers it was a short walk down to where the Amahoro group were located.

Our Guide talking to the trackers

Our Guide talking to the trackers

Almost there

Almost there

We knew we were getting close to the Gorillas when we started hearing grunting noises and seeing moving bushes. I was taken aback when I saw the first Gorilla as it was so close to us but didn’t seem to mind us being there at all. There was a huge feeling of relief among the group that we had made it and had not been unlucky by missing the Gorillas entirely. The first few Gorillas we saw were fairly close up but we also saw a baby and the silverback sleeping in the distance before moving on to see more of the family, plus a better view of the silverback.

My first Gorilla Photo

My first Gorilla Photo

A Gorilla having lunch

A Gorilla having lunch

Trip and a Gorilla

Trip and a Gorilla

Another Gorilla having lunch

Another Gorilla having lunch

A few minutes later after leaving the silverback the bush next to me started rustling. Our guide encouraged us to move quicker but a Gorilla called Gahinga appeared out of the bush right next to me. He seemed to think we were new play things and grunted loudly before running past us and interacting with us in startling ways. I was grabbed on the knee as he ran past, Barry was prodded on the knee where he had a support bandage, Betty was poked and Trip was grabbed on the arm before being made to stand up straight by Gahinga because he was slouching. After being ushered away by our guide Gahinga got upset and ran back past us. Most of us got out the way but Leon wasn’t quick enough and was knocked onto his back in the middle of a bush.

If you think some things you’ve seen while travelling can get the adrenaline going there’s nothing like having a Gorilla touch you on the leg shortly before charging down a path towards you. He was only playing, and you could tell how intelligent he was with acts such as making Trip stand up straight and realizing that Barry had a problem with his knee, but he is still a wild animal and the encounter got my heart beating fast.

A Gorilla looking for the best food

A Gorilla looking for the best food

A Gorilla being as curious about us as we were about them

A Gorilla being as curious about us as we were about them

Me and a Gorilla

Me and a Gorilla

A few Gorillas

A few Gorillas

We stayed in that area for a while before discovering the majority of the family were relaxing in an area that was undercover and surrounded by bamboo just around the corner. We saw a few babies, young gorillas and adults playing and more came along in time – including Gahinga who decided to show off by punching the ground a few times, hitting his chest a few times then running away. This was the final place that we saw the Gorillas as we were only allowed to stay with them for an hour. I got some really good videos and photos though and had the time of my life.

Another Gorilla having lunch

Another Gorilla having lunch

We found the main family group in the Amahor Gorillas

We found the main family group in the Amahoro Gorillas

This baby Gorilla was so cute

This baby Gorilla was so cute

The Silverback watching us

The Silverback watching us

Another photo of the baby Gorilla

Another photo of the baby Gorilla

A close up view of a Gorilla

A close up view of a Gorilla

We met up with the porters, collected our bags and started going downhill. It wasn’t as hard going downhill but the stinging nettles got me this time while I wasn’t paying attention and trying to clean off some Gorilla deposits that I had stepped in. Wow what a smell… beats most things Ive smelt before!

After arriving back at the park boundary we thanked the soldiers and our guide before making our way back to the road to wait for our minibus. We picked up some souvenirs that the locals were selling while waiting before driving back to the park HQ to pick up some overpriced souvenirs and our certificates. On the way a kid started running behind us showing us some art he had drawn – I took a picture to see what it was and it turned out to be two Gorillas mating. I showed our driver and he burst out laughing, stopped the minibus and called the kid over before asking if anybody wanted to buy the drawing for $1. Leon bought that one and I bought another one of two Gorillas – one of which is showing off so I decided this one must be Gahinga. During our journey back we also saw a group of soldiers surrounded by some locals – our guide explained these were rangers embarking on a weeks mission into the National Park to protect the Gorillas and the locals were wishing them well.

The kid that sold us his Gorilla porn drawings

The kid that sold us his Gorilla porn drawings

We got back the convent and not only had everybody already arrived back but most people had already eaten lunch. Some had been back over 3 hours as their family groups were close to the boundary so they thought we were lost, in hospital or dead or something as we were supposed to be the group with the easiest trek. Maybe we were out the longest but we definitely had the best experience on the mountain after talking to the other groups. They got really close and got better photos than us but we had the Gahinga incident to talk about.

After showering, washing etc I went to the bar for some drinks with Al, Jono and Leon to talk about the day. Others arrived from town and we all talked some more before dinner which was a traditional African meal that Den had cooked for us consisting of some weird maize potato looking thing with different stews. We ate it in the traditional way without cutlery and it was very nice, just very filling.

We all went to the bar again after dinner to relax and talk some more about the day, show each other our photos and everybody agreed we definitely had the best experience in our group. I think everybody had an amazing time and will have so many good memories and stories to tell from just this day alone!

Talking about our day with the Gorillas in the bar

Talking about our day with the Gorillas in the bar

I’ve been up since 5am so I’m planning to have an early night tonight but there’s a loud TV in reception which is stopping me from relaxing at the moment so I’ll probably just have one of my usual nights but at least my back won’t hurt as much.

[I found out later from Jono that they were watching a soft porn video!! A convent that watches porn, has a bar serving alcohol, in the middle of Rwanda with all sorts of birds flying overhead is definitely a surreal place.]

Definitely my favourite photo of me from the day!!!

Definitely my favourite photo of me from the day!!!

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Africa Day 10 – Kigali Genocide Memorial

August 30th, 2009 No comments

Today was a very long day but one that would show us so many things and be memorable for good and bad reasons.

I woke up really early in an attempt to have a nice shower before everybody used the hot water but fell down a ditch that ran across the campsite in the process. Luckily I didn’t injure myself and I was treated to a lovely hot shower, albeit in the dark. By 6am breakfast was ready and we left just after 7am so that we wouldn’t arrive in Rwanda too late and would have enough time to stop at the viewpoints along the way. The first viewpoint was at the top of the hill overlooking Lake Bunyonyi where we took some good photos and talked to a little kid who was reluctant to come close until I said hi in his local language.

Me at Lake Bunyonyi

Me at Lake Bunyonyi

The reluctant kid

The reluctant kid

On the way down the hill into Kabale the leg snapped on one of our seats at the back of the truck but luckily as we were driving through the town one of our group saw somebody welding something outside their house and we stopped to ask for their help. He agreed and spent 45 minutes helping us in exchange for a token payment – before 8am on a Sunday which was incredibly good service. We talked to some local kids for a while before making our way to the Rwandan border, arriving just after 9 and finally getting into Rwanda just before 11. Luckily the time was an hour behind in Rwanda so it was really 10am.

At the welders fixing Oscar

At the welders fixing Oscar

Me and the kids while Oscar is fixed

Me and the kids while Oscar is fixed

Rwandan Border Controls

Rwandan Border Controls

We arrived in Kigali, the capital of Rwanda, at 1130 and made our way to the Genocide memorial. To start with we were given a brief tour of the gardens containing mass graves of over 258,000 people before being shown and a wall which has been started containing the names of all the people buried so far. After looking around the gardens we were taken to the main building for a self-guided tour of the exhibits.

The exhibits inside the memorial centre told the story of Rwanda in history, before occupation, the colonialisation by Belgium, the first genocide of 1959, the problems before the 1994 genocide, the role of the UN, experiences during the genocide and then the aftermath. It also showcased photos of people that were killed, their stories and finally showed the bones of some people that had been killed which was an incredibly moving experience. Upstairs there were further exhibits of other genocides such as Namibia, Germany, Armenia, Serbia etc which we browsed for a while before going to the gift shop in the courtyard where I managed to spend 15000 of the 19800 Rwandan Francs that I changed at the border on everything from charity wristbands and t-shirts.

Rwandan Scenery

Rwandan Scenery

Kigali city

Kigali city

Name wall at the Genocide Memorial

Name wall at the Genocide Memorial

Mass Graves at the Genocide Memorial

Mass Graves at the Genocide Memorial

Around 2 hours after arriving at the centre members of our group started congregating in the memorial centre car park for lunch, being attacked by flies in the process, before seeing people leaving a memorial service that had been taking place at the centre for somebody that was killed in the genocide but had only recently been identified.

Lunch at the memorial centre

Lunch at the memorial centre

Me in Kigali

Me in Kigali

We left Kigali and drove towards Ruhengeri, taking lots of good photos on the way. There are so many hills in this country which is how Rwanda earned its nickname – The land of 1000 hills – and in fact I didn’t see a piece of flat land during the entire journey. After arriving in Ruhengeri fairly late we made our way to Fatimas which is the accommodation attached to the convent that we are staying in for the next 3 nights. I have decided to upgrade to a private room as it was only $14 a night extra which was very reasonable and a few private nights in bed will probably do me the world of good as I haven’t slept much recently.

We had a nice meal of chilli and rice and drinks in the bar to talk about tomorrow’s gorilla trek before heading off our separate ways for an early night. We need to be awake at 5am tomorrow so all of the people in the rooms have agreed to wake each other at around 530 to ensure we are ready in time.

Mountains of Rwanda

Mountains of Rwanda

A Volcano close to Ruhengeri

A Volcano close to Ruhengeri

My room at Fatimas

My room at Fatimas

I’m looking forward to tomorrow and hope we’re lucky enough to see Gorillas. We’ve been warned that although it is virtually guaranteed that we will see Gorillas there are some days where nobody sees any.

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Africa is all booked again

May 26th, 2009 No comments

I’m pleased to announce, now that I’ve added a full blog of my first ever overland Africa trip, that my next one is now fully booked – Kenya, Uganda and Rwanda with Dragoman!

I’ll be flying out to Nairobi in the last half of August, staying there for the night before heading out through Kenya, into Uganda and finally to Rwanda to see the rare Mountain Gorillas. Then we’ll be making our way back through Uganda to Kenya again where I’ll have one final night in Nairobi before flying back to the UK.

Highlights of the trip will include

  • Nairobi, Kenya
  • Lake Nakaru
  • Eldoret, Kenya
  • Kampala, Uganda
  • Jinja / Lake Victoria
  • Queen Elizabeth National  Park
  • Trekking with Chimps in the Kibale Forest
  • Lake Bunyoni
  • Lake Mburo
  • Kigali, Rwanda
  • Rwandan Genocide Memoria
  • Trekking with Mountain Gorillas near Ruhengeri, Rwanda

There’s no point going into too much detail as I don’t know everything that will be going on just yet – and being Africa things will change quite a lot. I thought I’d post it now that everything including any extras have all been booked, so that you can access the RSS feed of this category to subscribe should you wish to. I’ve given this trip it’s own category as I’ll be out of the country for 18 days and will have lots of things to talk about so it’s probably a good idea to separate things 🙂

I’m getting really excited about this. I love Africa and had a great time in Namibia when I was there in 2002. I don’t know why but I’ve always wanted to visit Rwanda and in a few months I’ll get my chance :). Expect a full report from me when I get back, maybe quick updates from me when I’m out there if I get net connection.

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